Public Speaking Classes

Ever wonder how you can sound better?  My class,  “Improve Your Speaking Voice: How to Sound Better in Any Situation,”  will help you uncover the secrets of how you can achieve a stronger, more dynamic speaking voice.

img_0511-2The class is available for companies and organizations, as well as private sessions and  individual, on-demand coaching. 

Or try my Public Speaking Mastery classes, which will help you turn dull speeches into presentations that will captivate your audience.  Learn how to conquer your fears, gain confidence, be a more dynamic speaker, and be heard.  All classes are tailored to meet individual needs.

Please contact me at speechdoctor @nyc.rr.com or publicspeaking4u@aol.com . Or phone me at (212) 877-2798.

Summer Public Speaking Classes

This summer I’m offering two one-time classes at New York’s 92nd Street Y.

In Body Language and Awareness for Public Speaking on July 17 you’ll learn about the important role your body plays in helping conquer nervousness and in achieving a stronger presence as a public speaker.

Improve Your Speaking Voice: How to Sound Better in Any Situation begins on July 24 and uncovers the secrets of how you can have a stronger, more dynamic speaking voice.

img_0511-2Private classes are available on demand, and offer  participants of all levels a small, supportive environment  with time for individual exploration and  practice.  Learn how to turn dull speeches into presentations that will captivate your audience, and how to conquer your fears and be heard.

If you can’t make my summer classes at the Y, please contact me at speechdoctor @nyc.rr.com or publicspeaking4u@aol.com about individual sessions and on-demand workshops.

Stop Speeding.

Canada_Stop_sign.svgI recently went to an off-Broadway show in previews, presented by one of New York’s better theatre companies.  One of the leads was speaking so fast that you just couldn’t get his words straight.  At certain points in the play his breakneck speed was forcing the other actors to up their pace in order to keep up with him.    Bottom line: the audience lost a number of good lines.

Following the show, one of the people in my party complained to a theatre staff member that it was difficult to follow the dialogue.  Then, another theatre-goer voiced the same concern.  The staff member acknowledged that there was a problem.

Speeding can often be a result of nervousness.  It can also reflect that your mind is jumping ahead of your mouth. Maybe we should issue speeding tickets for people who chatter too fast.

Are you a speeder? If speaking too fast is your problem, imagine a speeding car.  Visualize a “Slow” and “Stop” sign ahead.  Just as with a car, slow down your pace.   It will feel uncomfortable at first.  But once you get used to speaking at a slower pace, you will find that people will follow you with greater ease.  And, best of all, you will be in control of the speed!